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KUMIHIMO 2-Day


  • Maiwa Loft #6-1666 Johnston St. Vancouver, BC, V6H 3S2 Canada (map)

With Makiko Tada

$295 [Includes $85 lab fee] class limit 16. Oct 11, Oct 12 (Wed, Thu) 10am-4pm.

Kumihimo is the ancient Japanese art of braiding. Over many centuries, simple braiding evolved into the wonderfully detailed and accomplished art of kumihimo. Techniques developed to make square, helical, and oval forms as well as dynamic shapes that changed over the length of the cord.

Prestige uses for the kumihimo included works for the imperial court and the distinctive samurai armour known as Yoroi. The elaborately constructed cords also found a place in obijime (a braid used over the obi when wearing a kimono).

Kumihimo is an art that attracts fibre artists from all areas. Kumihimo can be practiced with humble materials, such as string and twine, or exceptional fibres, such as metal threads, and a wide variety of silks. Jewelers find inspiration in the corded patterns, and textile artists discover new possibilities for edging and fringe work.

The two workshops cover similar ground with additional time devoted to technique in the 3-day workshop. Students will be provided with kumihimo disks and plates to use and keep.  Maiwa is also providinga selection of special metallic threads and Sanjo silks.

The 13th late Jusuke Fukami was the Living National Treasure of Japan, the only one among kumihimo craftsmen to receive this honour, and his kumihimo techniques were passed to Makiko as one of his two grand-students. She continues to teach and make kumihimo.

Makiko Joins us from Japan.

Supply List PDF


Makiko Tada has been studying and making Japanese braids (kumihimo) for more than 50 years; she has been studying Andean braids for 35 years. Makiko is a researcher, designer of kumihimo, and lecturer at Kyoto Institute of Technology where she received her doctorate of engineering in 2003. She has published widely on kumihimo and travels internationally to lecture and teach workshops.

The 13th late Jusuke Fukami was the Living National Treasure of Japan, the only one among kumihimo craftsmen to receive this honour. His techniques were passed to the late Yuji Furusawa and the late Kazuko Kinoshita. Makiko was the sole pupil of Kazuko Kinoshita. She continues to teach and make kumihimo.

Later Event: October 12
Burgeoning Braids